WellUrban

Personal reflections on urbanism, urban life and sustainable urban design in Wellington, New Zealand.

Friday, March 03, 2006

Satisfaction

While walking past (and I emphasise the word "past") Il Bordello the other day, I couldn't avoid noticing the song that their sound system was playing: "I can't get no ... satisfaction". Hardly good advertising!

4 Comments:

At 2:23 PM, March 03, 2006, Blogger bush whacker said...

Admiring the architecture no doubt Tom? The tasteful 3foot high roses as window decoration? (is that a very clever play on the word "rose window" or do you think the irony has swept by them?)

The careful modulation of the windows, complete with solid back-fill to block out any views in or out? Or the rear view, complete with false parapet, Bahgdad bunker type security detailing, and a nice tall pickettty type fence?

I think perhaps you should test their Martini prowess, and report back what the inside is really like....

 
At 3:06 PM, March 03, 2006, Blogger Tom said...

"Rose window": nothing to do with "stemming the rose", I take it? And yes, the black windows don't create much in the way of an active edge to the street, and though the council has been talking a lot about encouraging something called "interactive retail", I doubt if the planners would have been impressed by Amsterdam-style clear glass "shop windows".

I made the somewhat arbitrary decision to omit brothels and strip clubs from my bar list. Probably wisely, given that a Napier brothel owner was prosecuted when his clients drank without having sex. So no, I won't be able to give a report on the interior design, and I don't suppose they'd be happy with me taking photos, so it won't be a mystery bar.

 
At 5:49 PM, March 03, 2006, Blogger the_sifter said...

... and here was me thinking that the post was going to be about your frustration in acquiring Rollings Stones' concert tickets...

;-)

 
At 5:10 PM, March 06, 2006, Anonymous DEATH said...

Oho, discreet entrance off Swan Lane wasn't too discreet today as my class was there drawing the buildings. Poor sad rich men who couldn't work up the courage to stride confidently past a group of students with pencil and paper provided great entertainment. Especially one guy who kept getting in and out of his car and fidgeting a lot. I'm not even sure that the place was even open.

 

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